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MINISTERIAL STUDIES
COURSE OF STUDIES

bib-1013 Telling the Old Testament Story of God

Module Vision Statement: This module serves as a foundational module for further biblical studies. It constitutes an introduction to the Old Testament. Consequently, no other modules are necessarily prerequisite for this module. This module, however, should be considered as a prerequisite to other modules which focus on further studies in any portion of the Old Testament.

BIB-1023 Telling the New Testament Story of God

Module Vision Statement: Telling the New Testament Story of God is a foundational module for understanding the setting and message of the New Testament. This module will introduce the student to the New Testament biblical literature, Bible study methods, and the environment of the Early Church. Special attention will be given to the political, cultural, religious, and geographical setting, the literary genre, and the meaning of the text in its original cultural, historical, and literary context for the purpose of discovering the principles of truth to be applied to our contemporary setting. It provides the basic groundwork for understanding future Course of Study modules in biblical studies, Church history, Christian theology and practics.

BIB-1033 Interpreting Scripture

Module Vision Statement: The very nature of the Bible as the message of God is communication and thus it must be interpreted. The question is not whether to interpret Scripture but whether it is interpreted well or poorly. The module is designed for believers who are called into a ministry of communicating the Word. The primary context of their ministry is the Church, which is nurtured by the Holy Spirit’s application of Scripture to its life and work. To grow in this, ministry students need to learn the appropriate tools and processes of interpretation and to practice the use of such tools and processes. Beyond knowing, students must become lovers of Scripture, seekers after God, and joyfully committed to adopting the message into their own lives and to their contemporary contexts.

bib-2013 Tracing the Story of God in the Bible

Module Vision Statement: Biblical theology attempts to summarize and synthesize the main strands of the diverse theological assumptions and affirmations of the Bible. The Bible is not a systematic theology. Nevertheless, Wesleyans share the Protestant conviction that Scripture must provide the foundational source for all theological reflection that is truly Christian. Authentically Christian preaching must also arise responsibly from the biblical text.

bib-2033 Exploring John Wesley's Theology

Module Vision Statement: The Church of the Nazarene is a “Wesleyan-holiness” church. By this designation, we affirm that the theology of John Wesley undergirds and informs both our theological conclusions and our theological method. While Wesley should be seen as a mentor, not “guru” (as once expressed by Mildred Bangs Wynkoop), it is crucial to our denominational identity that we teach, preach, and minister as Wesleyans. “Wesleyan-holiness” also designates that we put holiness as the hermeneutic for interpreting Wesley’s life and thought, and recognize that the holiness movement of the 19th century—out of which the Church of the Nazarene was formed—was an attempt to remain faithful to Wesley’s emphasis on the “way of salvation.” Wesley defined salvation as more than a moment in time: it includes the lifelong process of inward and outward holiness, as well as the paramount experiences of new birth and sanctification. Our understanding of holiness should never be divorced from Wesley’s theology more broadly defined. This is crucial as we move into the 21st century, when a fundamentalist absolutism on the one hand or religious relativism on the other seem to be the only options. “Holiness of heart and life” is important to every generation. It is extremely important that those preparing for ordained ministry in the Church of the Nazarene catch, hold, and utilize the dynamism of the Wesleyan theological paradigm. This course is designed with the future denominational identity of Nazarenes firmly in mind.

bib-2033 New testament Gospels

Module Vision Statement: The Church of the Nazarene is a “Wesleyan-holiness” church. By this designation, we affirm that the theology of John Wesley undergirds and informs both our theological conclusions and our theological method. While Wesley should be seen as a mentor, not “guru” (as once expressed by Mildred Bangs Wynkoop), it is crucial to our denominational identity that we teach, preach, and minister as Wesleyans. “Wesleyan-holiness” also designates that we put holiness as the hermeneutic for interpreting Wesley’s life and thought, and recognize that the holiness movement of the 19th century—out of which the Church of the Nazarene was formed—was an attempt to remain faithful to Wesley’s emphasis on the “way of salvation.” Wesley defined salvation as more than a moment in time: it includes the lifelong process of inward and outward holiness, as well as the paramount experiences of new birth and sanctification. Our understanding of holiness should never be divorced from Wesley’s theology more broadly defined. This is crucial as we move into the 21st century, when a fundamentalist absolutism on the one hand or religious relativism on the other seem to be the only options. “Holiness of heart and life” is important to every generation. It is extremely important that those preparing for ordained ministry in the Church of the Nazarene catch, hold, and utilize the dynamism of the Wesleyan theological paradigm. This course is designed with the future denominational identity of Nazarenes firmly in mind.

bib-2053 Pauline epistles

Module Vision Statement: The Church of the Nazarene is a “Wesleyan-holiness” church. By this designation, we affirm that the theology of John Wesley undergirds and informs both our theological conclusions and our theological method. While Wesley should be seen as a mentor, not “guru” (as once expressed by Mildred Bangs Wynkoop), it is crucial to our denominational identity that we teach, preach, and minister as Wesleyans. “Wesleyan-holiness” also designates that we put holiness as the hermeneutic for interpreting Wesley’s life and thought, and recognize that the holiness movement of the 19th century—out of which the Church of the Nazarene was formed—was an attempt to remain faithful to Wesley’s emphasis on the “way of salvation.” Wesley defined salvation as more than a moment in time: it includes the lifelong process of inward and outward holiness, as well as the paramount experiences of new birth and sanctification. Our understanding of holiness should never be divorced from Wesley’s theology more broadly defined. This is crucial as we move into the 21st century, when a fundamentalist absolutism on the one hand or religious relativism on the other seem to be the only options. “Holiness of heart and life” is important to every generation. It is extremely important that those preparing for ordained ministry in the Church of the Nazarene catch, hold, and utilize the dynamism of the Wesleyan theological paradigm. This course is designed with the future denominational identity of Nazarenes firmly in mind.

bib-3013 Living Ethical Lives

Module Vision Statement: From its very beginning the Wesleyan-Holiness tradition has emphasized the moral implications of the gospel. This theme is not unique to the Holiness tradition since all Christians understand that healthy Christianity bears fruit. The purpose of this module is to call attention to this reality by pointing toward the multiple sources and resources for Christian character found in the Scripture as it has been handed on to each new generation. Special attention will be given to the unique way in which moral reflection has characterized the Wesleyan-Holiness tradition. Another trajectory for this module is Christian character. Such things as integrity, fidelity, consistence, and generosity speak to the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer. Part of the importance of this module is to be found in calling attention to the crucial sense in which embodying the faith should be understood as a material outgrowth of the preaching of the gospel. In other words, to preach the gospel without the intention to live it out is unthinkable in the Wesleyan-Holiness tradition.

CEM-1003 Providing Christian Education

Course Vision Statement: The course is a basic introduction to the field of Christian education. Christian education has its foundations in two primary areas: (1) Christian theology and (2) education. Therefore, we will be exploring the theological roots (both in the Bible and history) of Christian education and the education principles and practices that enable our efforts to be effective and relevant. The primary context in which Christian education takes place is the community of faith, which is most often expressed in the local church. So our study will focus primarily on Christian education in the local church and the various types of educational settings and structures present there. At the completion of the course, the students and teacher will have a clearer understanding of how Christian faith is nurtured in persons and communities. They will be equipped with some basic skills to create strong educational structures, materials, and practices for use in their own settings. They will also have a growing passion to see children, youth, and adults become Christians and be nurtured in Christian faith.

ENG-1013 Communicating with Spoken and Written Language

Module Vision Statement: The call to serve God includes communicating the Gospel in spoken words or written words. Studying the principles of clear and effective communication can increase the minister’s effectiveness in this Great Commission. However, speaking and writing are skills that require practice as well as understanding. Rigorous thinking, clear expression, and adapting message to audience are skills that develop only through repeated and guided practice.

fwM-1099 foundations of women's ordination

Module Vision Statement: Foundations of Women’s Ordination is an interdisciplinary module for understanding why the Church of the Nazarene ordains women. This module will introduce the student to the biblical, historical and theological foundations, as well as the practical issues related to this topic. The founding themes are Gender Mutuality, the restoration in Christ of the human race to the image of God and the giving of spiritual gifts as the responsibility of the Holy Spirit and not based on human criteria.

HIS-2013 Examining Our Christian Heritage I

Module Vision Statement: The lessons are based on general goals that revolve around five basic themes in the history of Christianity: Scripture and tradition; church structures; church and society; the spread of Christianity; and Christian spirituality, including Christian life, worship, and ministry. Understanding these aspects of the history of Christianity provides perspectives essential for Christian ministry in the world today.

HIs-2023 Examining Our Christian Heritage II

Module Vision Statement: The units for this module are based on general goals that revolve around five basic themes in the history of Christianity: Scripture and tradition; church structures; church and society; the spread of Christianity; and Christian spirituality, including Christian life, worship, and ministry. Understanding these aspects of the history of Christianity provides perspectives essential for Christian ministry in the world today.

otr-2013 Communicating the Gospel in a Pluralistic World

Module Vision Statement: Christian discipleship and ministry in a world marked by a diversity of world religions is not new for the Church. Many of the early Christians had “turned to God from idols, to serve a living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead—Jesus, who rescues us from the wrath that is coming” (1 Thess 1:9-10, NRSV). But a post-modern pluralistic ideology is new, at least two centuries in the making. The ideology of religious pluralism claims that not only are there many religions, the diversity represents the way things “ought to be.” There exists no single religious perception of reality that is universally applicable and binding. No religion can legitimately claim to proclaim the truth for all persons. There is no metanarrative, no overarching story. There are many narratives, all of which are “true” to the extent they satisfactorily provide meaning for all persons and communities who participate in them. Religious narratives are as diverse and “true” as there are narrative communities. Pluralism may, but need not, rest upon the notion that behind the various narratives lies a single divine reality variously and legitimately expressed in humankind’s many cultures and communities. According to the postmodern ideology of religious pluralism, any religion that claims to have “the narrative” for all persons, and that tries to proselytize accordingly, ought to be seen as oppressive. It spreads injury in the world. It tyrannizes the human conscience and overwhelms human freedom. According to the ideology of religious pluralism, orthodox Christian doctrine as expressed in the New Testament and the Church’s creeds is a holdover from the long night of human oppression. Christianity either needs to be made a respectful member of the human community or it needs to be abandoned.

otr-4013 Leading the People of God

Module Vision Statement: The overarching vision for this module is for each student to embrace the biblical model of “servant” as the driving force and organizing principle within the individual as he or she seeks to lead a Christian community of faith.

pas-1023 Practicing Wesleyan-Holiness Spiritual Formation

Course Vision Statement: What if the learning leader and students really opened their minds and hearts to all that God may want to do during this course? Suppose God wanted to launch a life-changing transforming movement of faith, fervor, and devotion that we cannot now even imagine through the experiences of this course. Therefore, the vision statement begins with a call to the learning leader and students to put themselves at the disposal of God, the Holy Spirit. Let us make ourselves His—His if He wants to set us on fire for Christ. His if the Lord chooses to bless us with His silence. His if He seems to hide beyond the clouds beyond the reach of our prayers (Lam 3:44). His even if God’s silence can become for us a time of fertile emptiness in which we examine ourselves, submit to transformation, and imagine new beginnings. Let us be open to all the possibilities of grace.

pas-2013 Exploring Christian Ministry

The Modular Course of Study Series Foreword is a rationale for Exploring Christian Ministry. The module writer intends to view the minister and the ministry from a biblical perspective, to present the ministry as a high calling demanding holy living and hard work, and to encourage a hunger for and commitment to a lifetime of arduous study and patient ministry.

pas-2023 exploring Nazarene History and Polity

Module Vision Statement: This course is specifically designed for the person entering pastoral ministry. However, it would benefit anyone who will be employed by the church or who desires an understanding of the Church of the Nazarene, its history, membership, and how it operates. History and Polity of the Church of the Nazarene is a prerequisite and foundation for the doing of ministry. The course is designed to produce understanding of the identity of the Church, what is membership and how one becomes a member, and how the Church operates at its various levels of local, district and general. Theoretical insight and practical knowledge are a must for the wide range of tasks which the pastor faces.

pas-3023 Shepherding God's People

Module Vision Statement: This module introduces to the student the important task of Shepherding God’s People in the context of the local church. Caring for people is a central part of the role for those who enter the ranks of ordained ministry. Jesus’ words to Peter, “Take care of my sheep” (Jn 21:16), apply to all who are called to shepherd or pastor. This module will help the student understand and practice the principles of Christian “care of souls” in a manner that is comprehensively faithful to the biblical faith and human existence. This “care of souls” is not the exclusive responsibility of the ordained clergy but includes the laity in the ministry of the whole church. This curriculum is intended to help the student apply caring principles to the context of any local church. Pastoral care and counseling need to fit with the other pastoral responsibilities of preaching, teaching, leading, equipping, administrating, and many other tasks. This module introduces the student to the many broad topics commonly associated with the title of pastoral care and counseling. Because of the time constraints of the course, the student is encouraged to begin a lifelong journey of discovery and learning to hone the skills needed to be an effective pastor.

PAS-3033 Declaring the Gospel of God

Module Vision Statement: In order to contribute to the biblical and denominational intent for the Church to become a missional people and because humankind needs to be redeemed, Declaring the Gospel of God will challenge, inform, and equip students to become full participants in Christ’s mission by overcoming personal fears and coping with cultural resistance. The students will be God-called persons, seeking to be adequately prepared to be both personally involved and to lead others to involvement in Christian mission. These learners usually have limited experience with evangelism and limited exposure to unsaved people; they have few if any unsaved friends. If learning is contained only in the classroom, it will not be sufficient to gain the exposure, motivation, and on-the-job-training which is critical to be adequately prepared to become a leader in the deliberate intention of the Church of the Nazarene to become missional.

pas-3043 Preaching the Story of God

Module Vision Statement: This module serves to train the student in one of the most important tasks of pastoral ministry, the preaching of the Word of God. This task is considered foundational to fulfilling the calling of God to the ordained ministry. The Apostle Paul illustrated the importance of proclamation in his charge to Timothy: “Preach the Word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage, with great patience and careful instruction.” 2 Timothy 4:2.

PAS-4023 Administrating the Local Church

Module Vision Statement: Administration starts with a thorough understanding of Christ’s mission for His Church locally and globally. Such an understanding is needed to shape and motivate the accomplishment of interrelated ministries and tasks in a particular congregation. In a local congregation, administration could be defined as implementing and managing the mission of Christ in His Church. Administration is a continual and intentional process that connects and uses gifts of individual believers, to enable a particular congregation to win people to Christ and to build a spiritually healthy church. In the process, service does to the spirit of the one who serves something like what physical conditioning does to the body; as a result, the believer’s spiritual stamina develops. These three outcomes are incredibly significant: new people won, disciples developed, and churches strengthened.

PHI-4013 Communicating Christ Cross-Culturally

Module Vision Statement: This module recognizes that in a diminishing world of instant communication, and great population varieties, the Gospel must “contextualize” into language, gestures, and institutional styles that access the message to those around us. Many of us live in multicultural environments and, if not, we still have responsibilities to the larger world that is fast outpacing our ability to evangelize it. Furthermore, much of the emerging leadership of the Church is coming out of the twothirds developing world, challenging historical assumptions, and offering fresh and new ways of seeing the Gospel. How do we select and integrate the old with the new—patching wineskins or discarding them?

THE-1043 Becoming a Holy People

Module Vision Statement: The Church of the Nazarene identifies itself as a “holiness” denomination. This signifies two realities. First of all, our roots grow out of a tradition known as the “Holiness Movement” that arose in 19th-century America. We relate ourselves closely to other denominations born out of the same tradition. Holiness is an integral part of our historical identity. Yet, this “holiness” historical context also necessarily implies a “holiness” theology that undergirds subsequent historical events. The denominations and other associations of the movement all claimed—and claim—a particular understanding of a “doctrine of sanctification,” which can also be articulated as a “theology of holiness.” The very word “holiness” became an abbreviation for both of these realities—the “holiness movement” and “holiness doctrine.” The roots of this holiness doctrine can be traced back to the Early Church writers, particularly in the East—those Patristics who wrote in Greek. Aspects of the doctrine can be found throughout the history of the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and Anglicanism. John Wesley, of course, was the one who articulated a fully developed doctrine of sanctification; his theological vision, as well as his historical placement, led to the formation of the Methodist denomination—established in America in 1784. And yet, when Wesley’s theology of “Christian Perfection” met the 19th-century cultural, religious, and historical context, theological changes necessarily arose.

the-3023 Investigating Christian Theology I

Module Vision Statement: Historically, theology has been known as “the Queen of the Sciences.” While calling it that today may seem overly dramatic, all pastors-in-training will agree that a basic grounding in Christian theology is essential. Everything that a pastor does—praying, counseling, preaching, leading in worship—can and in one sense must be understood theologically. Whether acknowledged or not, theological implications assert themselves throughout the entire pastoral task, from first to last, top to bottom, front to back, side to side. It is too much to claim that theology is “the only game in town,” so far as the pastor is concerned, yet no other game makes any sense without theological awareness. Even a seemingly nontheological task like conducting a church board meeting may be the occasion for theological reflection. For example, current approaches to God as triune suggest that the Trinity is itself the model for perfect human community, being more than one that yet always functions, acts, and believes as one. Applied to the church board situation, this may mean that the pastor does not dominate the meeting, but shares collegially with all present, working with them toward consensus or even unanimity.

the-3033 Investigating Christian Theology II

Module Vision Statement: Historically, theology has been known as “the Queen of the Sciences.” While calling it that today may seem overly dramatic, all pastors-in-training will agree that a basic grounding in Christian theology is essential. Everything that a pastor does—praying, counseling, preaching, leading in worship—can and in one sense must be understood theologically. Whether acknowledged or not, theological implications assert themselves throughout the entire pastoral task, from first to last, top to bottom, front to back, side to side. It is too much to claim that theology is “the only game in town,” so far as the pastor is concerned, yet no other game makes any sense without theological awareness. Even a seemingly nontheological task like conducting a church board meeting may be the occasion for theological reflection. For example, current approaches to God as triune suggest that the Trinity is itself the model for perfect human community, being more than one that yet always functions, acts, and believes as one. Applied to the church board situation, this may mean that the pastor does not dominate the meeting, but shares collegially with all present, working with them toward consensus or even unanimity.

SME- Supervised Ministry Experience

Module Vision Statement: This module is different from others in the Modular Course of Study. It takes place over a much longer time. The primary learning environment is the local church rather than the classroom. The classroom time focuses on the student’s report to fellow students about real-life experiences in which he or she is engaged. The major purpose of this module is to link theory with practice by providing regular, structured, and supervised opportunities for students to apply and test knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed largely during classroom-based studies, in concrete experiences in the church and community. The key component for providing practical experience and developing key vocational skills and competencies is found in the Supervised Ministry Experience. The student will be required to demonstrate a range of skills appropriate for his or her ministry context. Issues of character development are also addressed.

DCPI- Dynamic church planting international

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